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Friday 22 June 2018
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Sitting at Work Is Affecting Your Health More Than You Know

We’ve all heard that sitting is the new smoking. Health studies consistently show that sitting for long periods of time can have tremendous negative effects on one’s health. You’re supposed to take 10,000 steps a day, as recommended by several healthcare professionals across the world. However, the average adult only walks between 4,000 and 6,000 steps in a day. This is probably because the majority of adults are sitting at a desk for 40 hours a week at work.

According to the Deccan Chronicle, sitting for prolonged periods is identified as a risk factor for early mortality. The number of deaths that can be attributed to sitting is up to 7%. Unfortunately, the common workday is one of the major contributors of sedentary behavior. Although this is the case for many, there are some solutions.

Craig Horswill, clinical associate professor of kinesiology and nutrition at the University of Illinois at Chicago, speaks to the Deccan Chronicle about a study conducted to try and solve the sitting at work issue. The study suggests that continuous movement while sitting may increase metabolic rate more than standing at a desk. This study adds to the already overwhelming evidence that increased spontaneous activity unrelated to a fitness routine is needed to help overcome the detrimental effects of sitting.

The study examined three different types of workstations and tested the metabolic rate that was produced by each. The first workstation they looked involved a participant simply seated at a desk. The second station had a device that stimulated leg movement. The final station was a standing desk.

The study showed that the small movements made at the station where leg movement was stimulated had a better metabolic rate than the sitting or standing stations. Metabolic rate was increased by 17% and 7%, respectively. The researchers stated that the stimulated leg movement station had no detrimental effects on cognitive function.

It looks like it’s time to invest in new desks for the workforce of the nation.




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